Progress of the Seasons Journal: 30 May – 5 June, 1827-1862.

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Here’s a summary of seasonal events from the archives. Perhaps more than some other periods, this seems to be a week that illustrates the wide ‘mood swings’ in the data even here in Columbia County, from Spring-like Apple flowering to early Summer-like ripe Peas.

One possible use for data like these is to evaluate past climatic patterns and one purported pattern now under renewed inspection is the so-called Little Ice Age, a history-twisting cold snap said to have lasted from roughly 1350 to 1850 (for more detail, see this or this).

Some scientists are now suggesting that, while there was some undeniably rough weather during this period, it was nothing that stood apart from the weather of much of the preceding period. They further propose that the large historical effects (e.g., decline of the Vikings, European crop changes) attributed to it are not borne out by inspection. Our data certainly won’t settle that question, but it would be interesting to see if our data from 1827-1850 differ markedly from those of 1850-1862. Not there yet….

A Wild Indigo Duskywing rests on the flowers of Birdsfoot Trefoil. A somewhat rare species a century or so ago (how many times have you seen Wild Indigo?), this is now one of our most common Duskywings given its acceptance of Crown Vetch as caterpillar food. CLICK TO ENLARGE

A Wild Indigo Duskywing rests on the flowers of Birdsfoot Trefoil. A somewhat rare species a century or so ago (how many times have you seen Wild Indigo?), this is now one of our most common Duskywings given its acceptance of Crown Vetch as caterpillar food.
CLICK TO ENLARGE

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A pair of Longhorned beetles court on flowering Grey Dogwood. CLICK TO ENLARGE

A pair of Longhorned beetles court on flowering Grey Dogwood.
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A fresh Question Mark butterfly rests in the sun. Caterpillars feed on Elm and other plants. CLICK TO ENLARGE

A fresh Question Mark butterfly rests in the sun. Caterpillars feed on Elm and other plants.
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A Tree Swallow peeks from what was probably meant as a Bluebird house. Swallows frequently take over such houses, but putting up paired houses can apparently help because the Swallows will not tolerate other Swallow neighbors but are less concerned about having Bluebirds next door. CLICK TO ENLARGE

A Tree Swallow peeks from what was probably meant as a Bluebird house. Swallows frequently take over such houses, but putting up paired houses can apparently help because the Swallows will not tolerate other Swallow neighbors but are less concerned about having Bluebirds next door.
CLICK TO ENLARGE

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A sharp Hobomok Skipper. We find these most often in edgy areas where forest meets field. Caterpillars feed on a variety of grasses. CLICK TO ENLARGE

A sharp Hobomok Skipper. We find these most often in edgy areas where forest meets field. Caterpillars feed on a variety of grasses.
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Mayapple in bloom. Fruits, which can be poisonous to humans when green, are apparently a favored Box Turtle food. CLICK TO ENLARGE

Mayapple in bloom. Fruits, which can be poisonous to humans when green, are apparently a favored Box Turtle food.
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A juvenile Red-tailed Hawk surveys the field. The surrounding song birds seemed none too concerned about this visitor, perhaps because song birds don't top the diet of this species and because this individual's lackadaisical grooming suggested it was none too hungry. CLICK TO ENLARGE

A juvenile Red-tailed Hawk surveys the field. The surrounding song birds seemed none too concerned about this visitor, perhaps because song birds don’t top the diet of this species and because this individual’s lackadaisical grooming suggested it was not particularly hungry.
CLICK TO ENLARGE

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A Unicorn Clubtail at CLC's Greenport Conservation Public Area rests after being visited by our net and some snoopy biologists. While not an uncommon dragonfly in the State, we've only recorded it once before. CLICK TO ENLARGE

A Unicorn Clubtail at CLC’s Greenport Conservation Public Area rests after being visited by our net and some snoopy biologists. While not an uncommon dragonfly in the State, we’ve only recorded it once before in the County.
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